Latest tweets

  • Loading tweets...

A Rule for Summer Lovin’

With summer now in full swing (in the northern hemisphere, at least), romance is undoubtedly in the air. The longer days are perfect for evening walks on the beach, dinner by sunset, or the always romantic late-afternoon pie eating contest. And while it is easy to let your better judgment swim away through the humid air, it is sometimes important to consider how your relationship may be viewed by your peers.

One of the most well-known rules of thumb is the half-your-age plus seven rule. This rule tries to quantify the intuitive idea that if you are dating someone younger than you, they should not be TOO much younger than you. Specifically, the rule says:

You should not date anyone before the age of 14. Once you are 14, you should not date anyone whose age is less than half of your age, plus seven years.

Originally, this rule was . . . → Read More: A Rule for Summer Lovin’

CNN Light Years Guest Post: How Professors’ Dads Made Math Fun

Hi all,

This weekend’s Father’s Day celebrations have inspired my monthly article over at the CNN Light Years blog. Here’s a sample:

There are many misconceptions about mathematicians in popular culture. For example, windows and mirrors do not make for the best writing surfaces, despite what you might assume from “A Beautiful Mind” or “Good Will Hunting.”

Mathematicians are also frequently portrayed as painfully socially awkward. And while this is sometimes the case, the true range of personality types is much more varied. Even among the more socially awkward, it is not uncommon for mathematicians to fall in love, marry and start a family.

What must it be like to grow up in a household with a mathematician? In the spirit of Father’s Day, I spoke with two mathematicians whose fathers were also mathematicians about what it’s like being raised in a mathematical household

Click here for the rest!

Were the San Francisco Giants #1?

Last month, I posted a review of a new book titled “Who’s #1?” on the mathematics of ranking and rating – if you’re interested, you can purchase a copy via the Amazon sidebar on the right. Today I’d like to study the San Francisco Giants with one of the techniques used in this book: the offense-defense rating method.

Why the Giants? It’s really just a personal preference. For the non-Giants fan, though, it’s worth pointing out that the Giants won the World Series in 2010, but failed to even make the playoffs in 2011. Let’s try to investigate why this is the case. Baseball fans may have their own explanations for this observation, but for a moment let’s focus on the math.

Let's go Giants!

As the name suggests, the offense-defense rating method rates a team’s offensive and defensive capabilities. Of course, these two things are highly interdependent – . . . → Read More: Were the San Francisco Giants #1?